Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
World welcomes new US president, hopes for renewed cooperation
spotlight AP

World welcomes new US president, hopes for renewed cooperation

  • Updated
  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}

MEXICO CITY — Leaders across the globe welcomed the arrival of U.S. President Joe Biden and the end of the often confrontational presidency of Donald Trump, noting the world's most pressing problems, including the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, require multilateral cooperation, an approach Trump ridiculed.

Many expressed hope Wednesday that Biden would right the world's largest democracy two weeks after they watched rioters storm the Capitol, shaking the faith of those fighting for democracy in their own countries.

Governments targeted and sanctioned under Trump embraced the chance for a fresh start with Biden, while some heads of state who lauded Trump's blend of nationalism and populism were more restrained in their expectations for the Biden administration — and in some cases spoke nostalgically of the Trump years.

But a chance to repair frayed alliances and work together to address problems extending beyond any one country's borders carried the day.

Biden "understands the value and the importance of multilateralism. He understands the importance of cooperation among nations," said former Colombian president and Nobel Peace Prize winner Juan Manuel Santos, who left office in 2018.

"As a matter of fact, if we don't cooperate – all nations – to fight climate change, then we will all perish. It's as simple as that," Santos said.

French President Emmanuel Macron also noted the urgency of addressing the perils the world faces from climate change after Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, a move Biden was to reverse in the first hours of his presidency.

With Biden, "we will be stronger to face the challenges of our time. Stronger to build our future. Stronger to protect our planet," he wrote on Twitter. "Welcome back to the Paris Agreement!"

Elsewhere in Europe, close U.S. allies finally saw a chance to come in out of the cold after strained security and economic relationships with the Trump administration.

"This new dawn in America is the moment we've been awaiting for so long," said European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, hailing Biden's arrival as "resounding proof that, once again after four long years, Europe has a friend in the White House."

European Council President Charles Michel said that trans-Atlantic relations have "greatly suffered in the last four years. In these years, the world has grown more complex, less stable and less predictable."

In Germany, President Frank-Walter Steinmeier issued a video statement, calling Biden's inauguration a "good day for democracy."

With Biden and incoming Vice President Kamala Harris, Steinmeier said the U.S. would again be a "vital partner" to tackle issues like the coronavirus pandemic, climate change, security issues including arms control and disarmament, and multiple conflicts.

Pope Francis urged Biden to help foster reconciliation in the U.S. and build up a society "marked by authentic justice and freedom" and looking out especially for the poor.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who formed close ties with Trump, noted a "warm personal friendship" with Biden. "I look forward to working with you to further strengthen the U.S.-Israel alliance, to continue expanding peace between Israel and the Arab world and to confront common challenges, chief among them the threat posed by Iran," Netanyahu said.

Photos: See how world welcomed new US President Biden

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Doctors in Hungary on Wednesday began administering a COVID-19 vaccine developed in China, making the country the first European Union nation to use a Chinese jab as officials aim to bolster trust in its safety and effectiveness.

  • Updated

LONDON (AP) — Former Scottish leader Alex Salmond on Friday criticized the government of his successor and one-time friend for undermining democratic principles and the rule of law, in the latest episode of a political tug of war that threatens to tear apart Scotland’s independence movement.

Recommended for you

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

Daily Alerts